New US law bans protests at military funerals

By
May 29, 2006 17:35

 
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President George W. Bush, marking the US Memorial Day holiday with a speech paying tribute to fighting men and women lost in war, signed into law Monday a bill that keeps demonstrators from disrupting military funerals. In advance of his speech and a wreath-laying at America's most hallowed burial ground for military heroes, Bush signed the "Respect for America's Fallen Heroes Act." This was largely in response to the activities of a small Kansas church group that has staged protests at military funerals around the country, claiming the deaths symbolized God's anger at US tolerance of homosexuals. The new law bars protests within 300 feet of the entrance of a national cemetery and within 150 feet of a road into the cemetery. This restriction applies an hour before until an hour after a funeral. Those violating the act would face up to a $100,000 fine and up to a year in prison.

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