Obama's ex-pastor: Israel is apartheid state, 'Jesus was a Palestinian'

Wright said that African-Americans, Native Americans and Palestinians have suffered under the "three-headed demon" of "racism, militarism and capitalism."

By JTA
October 12, 2015 05:36
1 minute read.
Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr. gives the keynote address at the 2008 NAACP Freedom Fund dinner in Detroit

Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr. gives the keynote address at the 2008 NAACP Freedom Fund dinner in Detroit. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Jeremiah Wright, President Barack Obama’s former pastor, called Israel an apartheid state and said “Jesus was a Palestinian” at a rally in Washington hosted by the Rev. Louis Farrakhan.

At an hours-long event Saturday on the National Mall titled “Justice or Else,” Wright said that African-Americans, Native Americans and Palestinians have suffered under the “three-headed demon” of “racism, militarism and capitalism.”

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


“The same issue is being fought today and has been fought since 1948, and historians are carried back to the 19th century … when the original people, the Palestinians — and please remember, Jesus was a Palestinian — the Palestinian people had the Europeans come and take their country,” Wright said, The Hill reported.

“The youth in Ferguson and the youth in Palestine have united together to remind us that the dots need to be connected,” Wright also said. “And what Dr. King said, injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere, has implications for us as we stand beside our Palestinian brothers and sisters, who have been done one of the most egregious injustices in the 20th and 21st centuries.”

The rally marked the 20th anniversary of the Million Man March, a mass gathering of black men spearheaded by Farrakhan, who has a long history of anti-Semitic remarks.

Wright, who retired in 2008 as pastor of Chicago’s Trinity United Church of Christ, which Obama attended from 1988 to 2008, also called Israel an apartheid state.


“As we sit here, there is an apartheid wall being built twice the size of the Berlin Wall in height, keeping Palestinians off of illegally occupied territories, where the Europeans have claimed that land as their own,” Wright said.

He concluded: “We are grateful to God to be able to be here and to speak a word on behalf of Palestinian justice. Palestinians are saying ‘Palestinian lives matter.’ We stand with you, we support you, we say God bless you.”

Farrakhan said at Saturday’s rally that blacks were too forgiving of their abusers.

“Find me a Jew who forgives Hitler,” the Nation of Islam leader said. “And they say they’re the children of God, and they don’t have no forgiveness in them.”

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May speaks to the media outside 10 Downing Street, in central Londo
December 10, 2018
‘Criticism of Israel not an excuse for antisemitism’ says Theresa May

By JEREMY SHARON