Protesters rally at Myanmar's embassy in Tel Aviv

Nationals working in Israel decry junta crackdown, call on regime to free student leaders and political prisoners.

By
October 1, 2007 14:30
Protesters rally at Myanmar's embassy in Tel Aviv

Myanmar 224.88. (photo credit: AP)

 
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Dozens gathered Monday at Myanmar's embassy in Tel Aviv to protest the recent crackdown on demonstrators by the country's military government. The protesters, most of them Myanmar nationals working in Israel, carried signs reading "Stop killing civilians" and "Demolish the military government in Burma," and called on the regime to free student leaders and political prisoners jailed for their part in demonstrations. "We are against the military government," said protester Aungo Naing Win. The junta, he said, has "arrested political prisoners, demonstrators, Buddhist monks ... everybody." Public anger in Myanmar ignited August 19 after the government hiked fuel prices, and the outrage quickly turned into mass protests after Buddhist monks joined in. Soldiers responded last week by opening fire on unarmed demonstrators, killing at least 10 people by the government's account. Dissident groups say at least 200 people may have died. Governments across the world have called on the junta to find a peaceful end to the crisis.

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