Report: Turkish newspaper gets police protection after publishing Charlie Hebdo cartoon

Financial Times reported the story. The newspaper’s editor, Utku Cakirozer, said that police had vetted Wednesday’s edition before allowing it to be printed and sold on newsstands.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
January 14, 2015 15:35
Charlie Hebdo

A policeman stands guard outside the French satirical weekly "Charlie Hebdo" in Paris, February 9, 2006.. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Turkish riot police were deployed to protect the offices of a secular newspaper that published Charlie Hebdo’s latest front page cartoon featuring the Prophet Mohammed, the Financial Times reported on Wednesday.

The move came after Wednesday editions of Cumhuriyet included a four-page pullout of passages from the satirical weekly that were specially translated into Turkish.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The newspaper’s editor, Utku Cakirozer, said that police had vetted Wednesday’s edition before allowing it to be printed and sold on newsstands.

Cumhuriyet, which has lost its own writers to terrorist attacks, understands the pain of the Charlie Hebdo massacre very well,” Çakırözer tweeted.

In years past, the newspaper has lost reporters who were murdered – allegedly by Islamist radicals – for articles that were published.

According to Financial Times, a car bomb killed Ugur Mumcu, an investigative reporter, in 1993. Six other journalists who worked for the newspaper were also killed.

Cakirozer said that the newspaper decided to run the Charlie Hebdo cartoons as a gesture of solidarity with the French weekly.


Related Content

U.S. President Donald Trump receives a football from Russian President Vladimir Putin
July 20, 2018
Trump invites Putin to Washington despite U.S. uproar over Helsinki summit

By REUTERS