Retired military officers criticize Rumsfeld

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September 26, 2006 02:09
3 minute read.

 
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Retired military officers bluntly accused Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld on Monday of bungling the war in Iraq, saying U.S. troops were sent to fight without the best equipment and critical facts were hidden from the public. "I believe that Secretary Rumsfeld and others in the administration did not tell the American people the truth for fear of losing support for the war in Iraq," retired Maj. Gen. John R. S. Batiste told a forum conducted by Senate Democrats. A second military leader, retired Maj. Gen. Paul Eaton, assessed Rumsfeld as "incompetent strategically, operationally and tactically." "Mr. Rumsfeld and his immediate team must be replaced or we will see two more years of extraordinarily bad decision-making. The war and which party - Democratic or Republican - best handles US security are central issues in midterm congressional elections Nov. 7 in which control of the House of Representatives and possibly the Senate is up for grabs. Republicans lead both now. Public opinion polls show widespread dissatisfaction with the way the Bush administration has conducted the war in Iraq, but division about how quickly to withdraw U.S. troops. Democrats hope to tap into the anger in November, without being damaged by Republican charges they favor a policy of "cut and run." Sen. John Cornyn, a member of the Armed Services Committee, dismissed the Democratic-sponsored event as "an election-year smoke screen aimed at obscuring the Democrats' dismal record on national security." "Today's stunt may rile up the liberal base, but it won't kill a single terrorist or prevent a single attack," Sen. Mitch McConnell, the No 2 Republican, said in a statement. He called Rumsfeld an "excellent secretary of defense." Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter, a Republican speaking at the National Press Club Monday, said election-season politics may be what is standing in the way of finding a solution to the insurgency in Iraq. "My instinct is once the election is over there will be a lot more hard thinking about what to do about Iraq and a lot more candid observations about it," said Specter. The conflict, now in its fourth year, has claimed the lives of more than 2,600 American troops and cost more than $300 billion (€235 billion) Sen. Byron Dorgan, who led the session, told reporters last week that he hoped the meeting would shed light on the planning and conduct of the war. He said majority Republicans had failed to conduct hearings on the issue, adding, "if they won't ... we will." Since he spoke, a government-produced National Intelligence Estimate became public that concluded the war has helped create a new generation of Islamic radicalism and that the overall terrorist threat has grown since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. Along with several members of the Senate Democratic leadership, one Republican, Rep. Walter Jones, participated. A conservative, he represents district that includes Camp Lejeune Marine base. It is unusual for retired military officers to criticize the Pentagon while military operations are under way, particularly at a public event likely to draw widespread media attention. But Batiste, Eaton and retired Col. Paul X. Hammes were unsparing in remarks that suggested deep anger at the way the military had been treated. All three served in Iraq, and Batiste also was senior military assistant to then-Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz. Batiste, who commanded the Army's 1st Infantry Division in Iraq, also blamed Congress for failing to ask "the tough questions." He said Rumsfeld at one point threatened to fire the next person who mentioned the need for a postwar plan in Iraq. Batiste said if full consideration had been given to the requirements for war, it is likely the US would have kept its focus on Afghanistan, "not fueled Islamic fundamentalism across the globe, and not created more enemies than there were insurgents."

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