US Army pushing to hand over more coalition posts

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December 25, 2005 03:17
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The US Army is hastening efforts to hand over command of military posts to Iraqi forces after parliamentary elections that many hope will produce a more stable government and set the stage for American soldiers to begin going home. Seventeen of the 109 former Iraqi bases used by coalition troops since the 2003 invasion have already been transferred to Iraqi command, while 30 have been shut down, Army officers say. The Pentagon is pushing for more in the coming months. "Eventually they're all going to go," said Maj. John Calahan, executive officer of the 101st Airborne Division's 3rd Brigade. "The ultimate plan is that we're going to have less presence in Iraq until finally we're gone." Defense analysts caution it may not be a fast process. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld made similar comments in Iraq this week, even as he said two Army brigades would not deploy to Iraq as planned. Commanders said that would cut US troop strength by 7,000, to around 130,000. Despite the step-up in efforts to turn more security duties over to Iraqi units, Calahan said concerns linger over the readiness of those troops.

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