US pressing to stop Turkish incursion into Iraq

Rice calls Turkish PM, head of Iraq's Kurdish region, asks that both sides show restraint.

By
October 22, 2007 16:34
1 minute read.
US pressing to stop Turkish incursion into Iraq

turkish protest 224 88. (photo credit: AP)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

The United States has opened a diplomatic "full court press" to urge Turkey not to invade northern Iraq, the State Department said Monday, as tensions between the two countries soared following an ambush by rebel Kurds that killed 12 Turkish soldiers and left eight missing. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice called Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and the leader of Iraq's Kurdish region, Massoud Barzani, on Sunday to press the US case for restraint from Turkey and Iraqi action against the outlawed Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK), department spokesman Sean McCormack said. "We do not believe unilateral cross-border operations are the best way to address this issue," he said, describing Rice's call to Erdogan, whose government has threatened military incursions into Iraq to deal with the PKK. "In our view, there are better ways to deal with this issue," McCormack said, stressing that the United States regards the PKK as a terrorist organization. He said Rice had told both Erdogan and Barzani that "we are going to do everything we can to encourage Turkey and Iraq to work together to address what is a common threat." "She underlined to President Barzani the importance of Iraq working actively with the Turkish government to counter what is a real threat to Turkish citizens," he said, adding: "It's important that there be action to counter the PKK." Erdogan said earlier that he had told Rice that Turkey expected "speedy steps from the US" in cracking down on Kurdish rebels and that Rice had asked "for a few days" from him. McCormack did not dispute the account of the conversation but declined to comment on what Rice had meant by asked for "a few days." As Rice was speaking to Erdogan and Barzani, the US Ambassador to Iraq, Ryan Crocker, was making similar points in Baghdad with Iraqi President Jalal Talabani - himself a Kurd - who ordered the PKK to lay down their arms or leave Iraq, and Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, McCormack said. The spokesman added that he "would not be surprised" if White House officials, including possibly President George W. Bush, followed up the Rice and Crocker conversations with Turkish and Iraqi officials. "From our perspective, this is a diplomatic full-court press," McCormack. "We want to see an outcome where you have the Turks and the Iraqis working together, and we will do what we can to resolve the issue without a Turkish cross-border incursion."

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

HE BEAUTIFUL buildings in Place des Vosges, Paris
October 21, 2018
Travel: In Paris, Place des Vosges and Victor Hugo

By BEN G. FRANK