US principal apologizes for Nazi speech broadcast

By
November 8, 2006 18:34

 
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Part of a speech by Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels was played over the public address system before a high school soccer game in North Carolina, prompting an apology by the home team's principal. Robert Carpenter, the principal of Forestview High School in North Carolina said neither he nor his team's coach knew about the speech before the 90-second German language excerpt was played during pregame warmups Saturday, according to a letter he sent Monday to visiting Charlotte Catholic High School. Carpenter said in the letter that the team had adopted the slogan "On to victory," and that a German exchange student who plays on the team had taught other students how to say the phrase in German. "Some of our more zealous students sought to capture this slogan in German and to play it on the PA," Carpenter wrote. School officials said two players had downloaded the speech off the Internet, and no adult heard it before it was played at the field, The Charlotte Observer reported Wednesday.

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