Wisconsin last US state to ban business in Sudan

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February 22, 2007 01:11

 
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In a move against genocide in the Sudanese region of Darfur, the state would become the latest to rid its pension fund of investments in foreign companies working with Sudan, under a bill introduced Wednesday. At least six US states - California, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, New Jersey and Oregon - have taken similar steps. The Darfur region has been torn by violence since 2003, when rebels of ethnic African tribes rose up against the Arab-led government, complaining of discrimination and mistreatment. At least 200,000 people have died in the violence and an additional 2.5 million people have become refugees. The measure calls for Wisconsin to sell its investments in foreign businesses that supply or provide services to the Sudanese government if more than 10 percent of a company's revenues in Sudan are connected to oil, mining or power production; if the company is complicit in what the bill terms "genocide" in Darfur; or if it supplies military equipment to the African nation.

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