Peres able to move hands as condition slightly improves after stroke

Sources close to the former president say he is able to respond to simple instructions from doctors.

By ORIT BROWN AGAMI/MAARIV, JPOST.COM STAFF
September 19, 2016 11:27
Shimon Peres

Shimon Peres. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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Doctors noted a slight improvement Monday in the condition of former president Shimon Peres, as the 93-year-old remained in serious but stable condition nearly a week after suffering a stroke.

Sources close to the senior Israeli statesman said that Peres had been able to respond to simple instructions from doctors on Sunday night, including moving both hands.

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His motor response may indicate to doctors that Peres hasn't suffered left-side cerebral damage.

On Sunday, Sheba Medical Center doctors decided to gradually reduce Peres's sedation while simultaneously trying to gradually wean him from his respirator.

Peres has remained in a medically induced coma as doctors evaluated the extent of damage from the hemorrhagic stroke which he suffered on Tuesday.

The week before the stroke, the nonagenarian underwent the placement of a cardiac pacemaker at the hospital and was discharged in good condition. He returned to the hospital for a checkup, but suddenly suffered a stroke.

It was unknown whether there was any connection between the insertion of the pacemaker – to ensure a regular heartbeat – and the stroke.




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