Einstein stamp issued by Israeli Postal Authority

The Israeli Postal Authority issued a new stamp commemorating Albert Einstein and the year of his greatest discoveries in 1905: A year which came to b

By JPOST.COM STAFF
October 19, 2005 13:14
1 minute read.

 
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The Israeli Postal Authority issued a new stamp commemorating Albert Einstein and the year of his greatest discoveries in 1905: A year which came to be known as Annus Mirabilis, the miraculous year. 2005 also marks 50 years since Einstein's death. The stamp bears an illustration of Einstein, as well as icons associated with his greatest achievements, including his legendary equation E=mc2, describing the relationship between light and matter. Einstein, the greatest scientist of the twentieth century, and possibly of all time, published his revolutionary works in physics, culminating with his theory of general relativity, at the age of 26. His discoveries completely altered contemporary paradigms concerning the nature of light, matter, space, and time, and awarded him a Nobel Prize in 1921. In 1952 the renowned Jewish scientist declined David Ben-Gurion's invitation to serve as president of the fledgling State of Israel, though he made sure to emphasize his strong connection with the Jewish people and their state.

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