Gov't investing in Ethiopian image

Absorption Ministry, Jewish Agency earmark NIS 1.3 million for campaign.

By HILARY LEILA KRIEGER
February 14, 2006 01:17
1 minute read.
ethiopian soldier smiles big 298

idfethiopian soldier 298. (photo credit: IDF)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Government officials launched a campaign Monday to improve the image of Ethiopians at an event marking 30 years of aliya from the east African country. The campaign, which also seeks to better integrate the Ethiopian population into Israeli society, will feature a series of television and newspaper ads of Ethiopian "success stories." More specifically, the initiative aims to help Ethiopians find jobs and recruit volunteers to help with the integration process. "The campaign is not supposed to provide an immediate solution but is part of the process. We decided to create a situation where Israeli society will be more open and give more opportunities to Ethiopian immigrants," said Immigration Absorption Minister Tzipi Livni. Livni's ministry and the Jewish Agency are splitting the cost of the NIS 1.3 million project, though the BBDO advertising company designed the ads for free and much of the television time and newspaper space will be provided without cost. Jewish Agency Chairman Zeev Bielski explained, "The debt of Israeli society to the immigration of 100,000 people [from Ethiopia] doesn't end when they reach the country." Idzik Dessie, who heads the Tebeka Center for Legal Aid and Advocacy for Ethiopian Jews, welcomed the campaign. He said members of the Ethiopian community needed to see positive role models. "The image of success is the most important thing," he said. "Until now the picture [of the Ethiopian community] that has been shown has been negative." He added, however, that the campaign "is not enough." He said that Ethiopians need to be in positions of influence in business, academia, and other sectors of the society. According to Dessie, 60 percent of Ethiopians with academic degrees are unable to find posts in their professions, and must work as security guards and in other blue collar jobs.

Related Content

Jisr az-Zarq
April 3, 2014
Residents of Jisr az-Zarqa beckon Israel Trail hikers to enjoy their town

By SHARON UDASIN