IDC founder Reichman plans Galilee 'science town'

A new private scientific research institution will soon be established in the Galilee.

By HAVIV RETTIG GUR
May 15, 2007 22:27
2 minute read.
uriel reichman 88

uriel reichman 88. (photo credit: )

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

A new private scientific research institution will soon be established in the Galilee, according to plans being developed by Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya president Prof. Uriel Reichman. The institute, expected to cost some $500 million, has already received promises of some $300 million in donations, two-thirds from private sources, and Reichman believes the rest will come as the establishment of the institute moves closer toward being a reality. According to the plans, Reichman told The Jerusalem Post on Tuesday, the institute will deal with "the avant-garde, the most difficult problems facing modern civilization, those that have a chance for a scientific breakthrough." In particular, it will focus on research into biomedicine - which Reichman said he thinks "will define the science of the coming century" - the biotechnology of plants, developing medications, water and energy. The new college, which will be established "as a project of the IDC," will include a medical school, allowing more direct application of research into the medical field. The site will be converted into a veritable town, Reichman enthused. Beyond offering scientists high salaries and research funds to attract the best from around the world, the center will offer a high quality of life. For example, plans include cultural facilities on institute grounds. Reichman describes the planning with enthusiasm, but grows bitter when asked about the timetable of the venture. "As always, the only problem is the Israeli government," he says. "We need to get the land, which, like all land in Israel, is state land. We need to have managerial independence in the institute, perhaps by establishing it as a private corporation. We need accreditation from the Council for Higher Education. And we need infrastructure built up to the location, though not inside it. Everything else can be solved by private funds." But, he complains, "in the seven months since I was asked [by Vice Premier Shimon Peres] to take this on, the state has been unable to make decisions on the land and on the rest. It's stuck." Asked to elaborate, Reichman explained that "the prime minister appointed a committee of ministry directors-general, and they're still checking all sorts of issues...We still don't know what the Israel Lands Authority thinks. We know there are problems with the Council for Higher Education." As months go by without result, he says, "it will be hard to hold the goodwill of donors." Nevertheless, Reichman remains optimistic. "The idea is wonderful and everybody supports it...It's stuck solely because of Israeli bureaucracy."

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Jisr az-Zarq
April 3, 2014
Residents of Jisr az-Zarqa beckon Israel Trail hikers to enjoy their town

By SHARON UDASIN