German court rules ex-Nazi, 86, won't serve life sentence

Man convicted by Amsterdam tribunal in 1949 for shooting three people during World War II; numerous attempts to enforce ruling unsuccessful.

By
July 5, 2007 21:37
1 minute read.
German court rules ex-Nazi, 86, won't serve life sentence

Nazis 298.88. (photo credit: )

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

A German court ruled Thursday that an 86-year-old former Nazi convicted of murdering three people during World War II would not serve out a 1949 sentence of life in prison handed down by a Dutch tribunal. The man, whose identity was kept confidential by the Cologne state court, was convicted 57 years ago in absentia by an Amsterdam tribunal of shooting three people in the Dutch towns of Breda, Vorschooten and Wassenaar in 1944 while serving as a member of Hitler's SS, the court said in a statement. Five years later, he was found guilty of the killings by a tribunal and sentenced to life in prison. But the Dutch-born man had already escaped the Netherlands and was living in Germany near Aachen, not far from the Dutch border, the court said. Dutch authorities tried unsuccessfully in the 1980s to have the man extradited to serve out his sentence. In February, a lower court in Aachen ruled the man, who now lives in a nursing home, could be sent to prison to serve out the sentence. The Cologne court's ruling overturns that decision. Although the Cologne court ruled that the killings would be considered murder under German law, and therefore punishable as such, because the man was denied legal representation during the Amsterdam trial, the 1949 conviction could not be legally enforced by authorities here.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Joan Rivers
August 28, 2014
Joan Rivers rushed to hospital following throat surgery

By JPOST.COM STAFF