Doing Design: Roman designs weren't built in a day

"Follow your dreams at all costs," says Israeli designer Hagit Pincovici who spends most of her time in Italy.

By EINAT KAYLESS ARGAMAN
November 13, 2012 14:37
Design

Hagit Pincovici. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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When you grow up surrounded by color and creativity and that’s all you know, it’s unlikely for you not to catch the artistic bug. For Hagit Pincovici, her grandparents’ acrylic factory was her childhood playground and it’s easy to imagine how wonderful life looks behind a curtain of dozens of colors.

At some point Hagit decided that she had to follow in her grandparents’ footsteps and without even knowing a word in Italian, she packed her bags and moved to Milan, a city that tends to transform industrial designers into rising stars. There, out of her own comfort zone, she began to shine.

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She began creating furniture that leans on traditional craftsmanship, but at the same time uses contemporary technology. It seems as if Hagit enjoys playing hide and seek within her creations and it’s possible to see how smoothly she makes the transition between transparent and sealed materials.      

Can you explain a little bit about your background? 


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