Comptroller: Dangerous substances a major hazard

The comptroller points a finger at the environmental protection ministry and Israel Railways for not acting on the municipality's request to move the train depot to a less populated area.

By MIRIAM BULWAR DAVID-HAY
December 2, 2007 07:38

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analysis from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

State Comptroller Micha Lindenstrauss has strongly criticized the storage of dangerous substances in the Haifa area, saying that in addition to the many factories and plants in the area, the unloading of dangerous chemicals from trains at the Haifa depot is a major hazard, reports the Hebrew weekly Yediot Haifa. The comptroller's report, issued last week, criticizes several government departments for not acting to reduce the risks to the population of Haifa. According to the report, the comptroller points a finger at the environmental protection ministry and Israel Railways for not acting on the municipality's request to move the train depot to a less populated area. He also says that while the transport ministry and treasury approved plans in 2005 to pave Highway 772 ("Kvish Deshanim"), which would bypass populated areas, work has not yet begun. And although the infrastructure ministry approved plans in 2004 to bury dangerous gas containers, nothing has yet been done about this. The comptroller said the missiles that fell on Haifa during the Second Lebanon War proved the risks involved in storing dangerous chemicals near populated areas, and the government must secure the sites or move them to more remote areas.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

JERUSALEM: RESETTLED upon its desolation
December 19, 2010
Vying for control of the Temple Mount – on Foursquare

By SHARON UDASIN

Cookie Settings