Apartments to be built on college land

The Local Planning and Construction Committee has decided to allow 450 residential apartments to be built on land belonging to the Seminar Hakibbutzim teachers' training college.

By MIRIAM BULWAR DAVID-HAY
November 1, 2007 11:03
1 minute read.

 
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The Local Planning and Construction Committee has decided to allow 450 residential apartments to be built on land belonging to the Seminar Hakibbutzim teachers' training college on Derech Namir, reports Yediot Tel Aviv. But the committee rejected a suggestion to move the college to south Tel Aviv and create an additional 100 apartments on the entire plot of land. According to the report, the college occupies only about 20 percent of its 50,000 square meters of land, and several years ago college managers agreed to allow the unoccupied land to be used for other purposes, on the condition that the builders would also tear down the rundown old college buildings and rebuild them. Now the committee has given its approval for three 27-storey residential towers, containing a total of 450 apartments, to be constructed on the site. During the hearings, deputy mayor Arnon Giladi objected to the idea, saying the construction would harm the quality of life of residents in northern Tel Aviv. He suggested moving the entire college to south Tel Aviv, between Yad Eliyahu and Kfar Shalem, saying this would "strengthen" the south and enable up to 100 more units to be built on the college lands, with less harm to northern residents than the current plans bring. But the Shas religious party objected to transplanting the college to south Tel Aviv, saying it would not be relevant to the local population and would only increase property rental prices in the area. The committee eventually decided to leave the college where it is and allow the construction of three residential towers on the unused land, with the proviso that some 2,000 square meters must be left for the use of the municipality.

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