Residents want quiet from rowdy Ra'anana soccer club

The residents' petition said the neighborhood "expresses its condemnation" of the city's decision, and asks it to stop the activities at the shelter immediately.

By MIRIAM BULWAR DAVID-HAY
December 16, 2007 08:51
1 minute read.

 
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Religious residents of Ra'anana's Rassco neighborhood have been infuriated in recent weeks after the city decided to allow a local soccer team to use the neighborhood's public bomb shelter for meetings on Saturdays, reports the Hebrew weekly Yediot Hasharon. The residents are complaining that their peaceful Shabbat mornings are being disturbed by the noise of cars arriving and leaving, loud music and shouts from the players. Dozens of residents signed a petition that has been sent to the city, asking it to revoke its decision to allow the activities at the shelter. According to the report, the city decided to allow the Maccabi Bnei Ra'anana soccer team to gather there out of a desire to encourage sports in the city in general, and to give the team a meeting place in particular. A municipal spokesman said the team was aware of the religious nature of the surrounding neighborhood, and carried out activities with consideration for residents' feelings. But many residents clearly disagreed, saying they "resent" the noise and disturbance. "We have nothing against the team, but this decision is at our expense," one resident said. And the residents' petition said the neighborhood "expresses its condemnation" of the city's decision, and asks it to stop the activities at the shelter immediately.

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