Combating sea terror

By
July 20, 2006 22:00
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Just hours after two soldiers were kidnapped by the Hizbullah in the North, Capt. Dani and his Third Flotilla were off to Lebanon to begin imposing a naval blockade on the country. The blockade was twofold - on the one hand to pressure the Lebanese government into releasing the abducted soldiers as well as prevent Syria from smuggling new weapon supplies to the Hizbullah. "This is an Israeli missile ship, please follow my instructions," Lt. Yoav calls sternly into a microphone on the bridge of the INS Lahav (Blade) Tuesday. "Stop at your current position and do not proceed any further." The Lahav, a Sa'ar 5-class missile ship like the Eilat, has become Capt. Dani's command post, from where he oversees all the navy's operations in Lebanon in his command post, including the blockade and the shelling of Hizbullah outposts near Beirut. "Our operations range from stopping ships from entering Lebanon to bombing Hizbullah outposts and rocket launchers," he explains. "Per the instructions of the political echelon, our main focus is on destroying Hizbullah infrastructure and in maintaining the naval siege imposed on Lebanon." Ten miles away, the navy has set up a "waiting area" for ships that have tried to leave Lebanon, says Lt. Zviel, one of the ship's deputy commanders. On Tuesday, eight ships were there, waiting for the navy to let them leave the region. The navy has yet to fire at a ship that has refused to heed orders, but officers on board the Lahav insist that they will do so if necessary.

Related Content