Ahmadinejad bans Western music

In return to Khomeini-era decree, 'un-Islamic music' outlawed on radio, TV.

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December 19, 2005 22:05
3 minute read.
Ahmadinejad bans Western music

ahmadinejad 298 AP. (photo credit: AP)

 
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Hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has banned Western music from Iran's radio and TV stations, reviving one of the harshest cultural decrees from the early days of 1979 Islamic Revolution. Songs such as George Michael's "Careless Whisper," Eric Clapton's "Rush" and the Eagles' "Hotel California" have regularly accompanied Iranian broadcasts, as do tunes by saxophonist Kenny G. But the official IRAN Persian daily reported Monday that Ahmadinejad, as head of Iran's Supreme Cultural Revolutionary Council, ordered the enactment of an October ruling by the council to ban Western music. "Blocking indecent and Western music from the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting is required," according to a statement on the council's official Web site. Ahmadinejad's order means the IRIB must execute the decree and prepare a report on its implementation within six months, according to the newspaper. "This is terrible," said Iranian guitarist Babak Riahipour, whose music was played occasionally on state radio and TV. "The decision shows a lack of knowledge and experience." Music was outlawed as un-Islamic by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini soon after the revolution. But as the fervor of the revolution started to fade, light classical music was allowed on radio and television. Some public concerts reappeared in the late 1980s. Western music, films and clothing are widely available in Iran, and hip-hop can be heard on Tehran's streets, blaring from car speakers or from music shops. Bootleg videos and DVDs of films banned by the state are widely available in the black market. Following eight years of reformist-led rule in Iran, Ahmadinejad won office in August on a platform of reverting to ultraconservative principles promoted by the revolution. Since then, Ahmadinejad has jettisoned Iran's moderation in foreign policy and pursued a purge in the government, replacing pragmatic veterans with former military commanders and inexperienced religious hard-liners. During his presidential campaign, Ahmadinejad also promised to confront what he called the Western cultural invasion and promote Islamic values. Earlier this month, Ali Rahbari, conductor of Tehran's symphony orchestra, resigned and left Iran in protest of the mistreatment of the country's music industry. Before leaving, he played Beethoven's Ninth Symphony to packed Tehran theaters over several nights last month in its first performance in Tehran since the 1979 revolution. The performances angered many conservatives, some writing newspaper columns accusing Rahbari of promoting Western-values. The latest media ban also includes censorship of content of films. "Supervision of content from films, TV series and their voice-overs is emphasized in order to support spiritual cinema and to eliminate trite and violence," the council said in a statement on its Web site explaining its October ruling. The council has also issued a ban on foreign movies that promote "arrogant powers," an apparent reference to the United States.

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