Iran photographer to get credit as Pulitzer winner

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December 8, 2006 02:03

 
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After more than 25 years of anonymity, the Iranian photographer whose iconic, chilling picture of an execution won the Pulitzer Prize will formally be recognized as the winner of the prestigious journalism award. Jahangir Razmi, whose identity was initially kept secret for his safety but revealed last weekend by The Wall Street Journal, will be given $10,000 (€7,520) and invited to New York for an award ceremony, the Pulitzer Prize Board announced Thursday. "We understand that Mr. Razmi, who is the best judge of his circumstances, is eager to receive the award," said Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzers. The photo depicted a line of 11 blindfolded men executed by a firing squad in 1979, after Islamic radicals overthrew the shah of Iran. It was published by the Iranian newspaper Ettela'at, but Razmi's editor chose not to credit the photo out of concern for the photographer's safety.

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