Planner of Munich Olympics attack dies

Abu Daoud passes away due to kidney failure at 73.

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
July 3, 2010 14:12
1 minute read.
Mohammed Oudeh

Mohammed Oudeh Abu Daoud 311. (photo credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 
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DAMASCUS, Syria — Mohammed Oudeh, the key planner of the 1972 Munich Olympics attack that killed 11 Israeli athletes, died in Damascus on Saturday. He was 73.

His daughter, Hana Oudeh, said her father died of kidney failure. She said he was rushed to Damascus's Andalus hospital after falling sick, and passed away on Saturday morning.

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Mohammed Oudeh, also known as Abu Daoud, did not participate in the attack on September 5, 1972. He was a leader of "Black September," an offshoot of the late Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's Fatah group that was established to avenge the 1970 expulsion of Palestinian guerrillas from Jordan.

Hana Oudeh said her father would be buried later Saturday in Damascus's Yarmouk Palestinian refugee camp.

In 2006 Abu Daoud said he “regrets nothing” and would not apologize for being one of the masterminds of the Munich attack. He told Germany's Spiegel TV it was up to Palestinians to “fight as long as it takes Israel to recognize our rights…You can only dream that I would apologize.”

Daoud reiterated what he said in his 1999 autobiography that the intent was never to kill the Israeli athletes. He was also quoted as saying the members of the Black September group killed by Israeli agents through the 1970s were the wrong people. “The people who were shot all had nothing to do with Munich,” he said.


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