Trump and Erdogan aim for closer ties despite US support for Kurds

Washington-Ankara ties strained by indictment of former Turkish economy minister for aiding Iran sanctions violations.

By REUTERS
September 10, 2017 11:12
1 minute read.
Edrogan Trump

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump as they give statements to reporters in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, US May 16, 2017. . (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

US President Donald Trump and Turkey's Tayyip Erdogan spoke on Saturday and agreed to continue to work toward stronger ties and regional security, Erdogan's office said, a day after he lashed out at US authorities for indicting one of his ex-ministers.

Ties between the United States and its NATO ally have been strained by Washington's support for the YPG Kurdish fighters in the battle against Islamic State in Syria. Turkey considers the YPG a terrorist group.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


Ankara has also been frustrated by what it sees as Washington's reluctance to extradite the Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen. Turkey blames Gulen, who has lived in Pennsylvania since 1999, for last year's failed coup.

"Noting the strategic partnership between Turkey and the United States, the two leaders emphasized the importance of continuing to work together to further strengthen bilateral relations and increase stability in the region," the Turkish Presidency said in a statement.

The two leaders agreed to meet in New York at the United States General Assembly, scheduled for this month.

The call was notable for its timing, coming a day after Erdogan described a US prosecutor's indictment against Turkey's former economy minister as being politically motivated and tantamount to an attack on Ankara.

The former minister, Zafer Caglayan, and the ex-head of a state-owned Turkish bank were charged this week with conspiring to violate Iran sanctions by illegally moving hundreds of millions of dollars through the US financial system on Tehran's behalf.



The indictment marked the first time an ex-government member with close ties to Erdogan had been charged in the on-going US investigation, which has strained ties between the two countries.

"For the moment, it is impossible to evaluate this within legal logic," he told reporters on Friday. "I see this step against our former economy minister as a step against the Turkish Republic.

He had also called on Washington to re-think the charges.

"I hope we'll get a chance to discuss this issue in the United States. You may be a big nation, but being a just nation is something else. Being a just nation requires the legal system to work fairly."

Related Content

Israeli Prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during a news conference at the Ministry of Defense
July 15, 2018
Key Mossad docs confirm extent of Iranian nuke plan revealed by Netanyahu

By YONAH JEREMY BOB