Tunisian court convicts 5 men of terrorism

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April 6, 2007 22:58

 
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A Tunisian court on Friday convicted five men of terrorism-related charges and handed them sentences of up to 28 years in prison, their lawyer said. The court sentenced computer expert Mohamed Moncef Baghdadi to a total of 28 years in prison in two separate cases. In one, he was charged with belonging to and collecting funds for a terrorist organization, said his lawyer, Samir Ben Amor. Prosecutors said Baghdadi raised money to send recruits to Algeria to join Al-Qaida in North Africa, formerly known as the GSPC, or the Salafist Group for Call and Combat. Two others were also sentenced to 10 years in prison in the case. In a separate affair also tried Friday, Baghdadi was convicted for training in explosives-making, a skill prosecutors said he had hoped to use in Iraq after joining up with insurgents there, the lawyer said. Another man was also handed a 16-year sentence in that case. In a third case, student Mehdi Mabrouk was sentenced to seven years in prison for planning to join Iraq's insurgency, Ben Amor said.

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