Yemenite Al-Qaida posts details of bombing attempt

"To bring down America we do not need to strike big," on-line magazine's editors write; "Operation Hemorrhage" cost only $4,200.

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
November 21, 2010 07:41
2 minute read.
A UPS office in San'a, Yemen.

UPS Yemen_311. (photo credit: ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 
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Al-Qaida of the Arabian Peninsula is promising more small-scale attacks like its attempts to bomb two US-bound cargo planes, which it likens to bleeding its enemy to death by a thousand cuts, in a special edition of the Yemeni-based group's English on-line magazine, Inspire.

The editors boast that what they call Operation Hemorrhage was cheap, and easy, using common items that together with shipping, cost only $4,200 to carry out.

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The group says it's part of a new strategy to replace spectacular attacks in favor of smaller attacks to hit the US economy, according to the English-language magazine, as posted by both Ben Venske's IntelCenter, and the Site Intelligence Group.

"To bring down America we do not need to strike big," the editors write. With the "security phobia that is sweeping America, it is more feasible to stage smaller attacks that involve less players and less time to launch" thereby circuventing US security, they conclude.

In the magazine, an author identified as the group's head of foreign operations says the package attacks were intended to cause economic harm, not casualties. "We knew that cargo planes are staffed by only a pilot and a co-pilot," the author writes, "so our objective was not to cause maximum casualties but to cause maximum losses to the American economy," by striking at the multi-billion dollar US freight industry.


The al-Qaida offshoot insists it also brought down a UPS cargo plane in Dubai in September, in addition to the Oct. 29th attempts to bring down a FedEx plane, and a UPS plane bound for the US. But US officials insist the Dubai crash was an accident caused by a battery fire, not terrorism.

The editors' boast that they chose printer cartridges in which to hide the explosive because toner is carbon-based, with a molecular composition "close to that of PETN," so it would not be detected. "We emptied the toner cartridge from its contents and filled it with 340 grams of PETN," the writers say.

In another article, the editors boast of how economically this was carried out, listing the cost of the items, including two Nokia mobiles, at $150 each, two HP printers, at $300 each, plus shipping, transportation and other miscellaneous expenses add up to a total bill of $4,200."

Those who monitor Jihadist sites say the post is a radical departure from the shadowy claims of responsibility common to most al-Qaida groups. "We have never seen a jihadist group in the al-Qaida orbit ever release, let alone only a few weeks after, such a detailed accounting of the philosophy, operational details, intent and next steps following a major attack," says the IntelCenter's Venske.

The fact that the group is "able to pump out this propaganda" shows al-Qaida is still able to operate with relative freedom, says the Carnegie Endowment for Peace's Christopher Boucek, despite U.S. officials' repeated requests that Yemen step up its counterterrorist operations, and share more intelligence with U.S. officials helping them on the ground in Yemen.

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