The terrible pollution isn't the real issue

The high temperatures and soaring humidity levels, however, are a completely different story.

By
August 7, 2008 05:31
1 minute read.
The terrible pollution isn't the real issue

allon sinai Olympics 88. (photo credit: )

Forget the pollution. If anything is going to hamper the athletes at the Beijing Games it's going to be the weather and not the smog. As bad as the pollution is (and it's awful), the distraction of having to talk about it all the time will upset most of the sportsmen more than the hindrance itself. The high temperatures and soaring humidity levels, however, are a completely different story. With the thermometer expected to remain at about 30 degrees Celsius for the coming week, and with humidity registering at almost 85 percent, just walking in the street takes a stupendous effort, not to mention running a marathon or playing a tennis match. Every athlete competing outdoors will suffer, and dehydration could well be an issue if participants aren't careful. Many of the competitors will, of course, not be alien to such conditions. But they will still struggle and those with more experience will benefit. With the conditions not too dissimilar to those of a hot summer's day in Tel Aviv, the horrendous heat could well prove to be an advantage for the Israeli delegation. Israel's stars are used to training in stifling heat and can only gain from the situation. So next time you're about to complain about the sticky weather or the pollution in Gush Dan remind yourself of one thing. It may be uncomfortable and is definitely unhealthy, but it could well play a key role in Israel's Olympic success in Beijing.


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