Lufthansa to boost Tel Aviv capacity

Due to bilateral agreements between Israel and Germany, the airline has had a capacity freeze on its flights to Israel which expires at the end of March.

By AVI KRAWITZ
December 22, 2005 07:12
1 minute read.
lufthansa 88

lufthansa 248 88 . (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Lufthansa German Airlines confirmed Wednesday that it has designated the world's largest aircraft, the wide body Airbus A340-600, for its Tel Aviv route beginning April 1, immediately after limitations on its capacity to Israel are due to expire. Due to bilateral agreements between Israel and Germany, the airline has had a capacity freeze on its flights to Israel which expires at the end of March. Industry sources said the German Civil Aviation Authority has invited its Israeli counterpart to meet in Germany on January 10 to discuss an updated aviation agreement. The airline operates two daily flights in and out of Israel. The new aircraft will replace the A330 it uses on morning flights out of Israel and the night flight from Frankfurt, adding 115 seats on each flight. It will continue to use a Boeing 747 for the other flights. Having seen a sharp rise of German tourist arrivals in Israel this year, a spokesman for the company said it is banking a major influx in 2006. Responding to the expected growth in traffic, Lufthansa has expressed interest in restarting flights to Munich. El Al, which currently flies 14 flights per week between Frankfurt, Berlin and Munich, has said it will increase that number to 18.

Related Content

El Al
August 16, 2014
The Travel Adviser: For El Al, mission accomplished

By MARK FELDMAN