Egyptians question Mubarak trial legitimacy

Citizens split over whether court case represents new era of justice or military ploy to placate demonstrators and maintain power.

By REUTERS
August 15, 2011 11:58
1 minute read.
President Hosni Mubarak on trial

Mubarak trial 311. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak arrived at a Cairo court on Monday to face charges of killing protesters during the uprising against his rule, his second appearance in the trial, state television reported.

An aircraft landed near the court building carrying Mubarak, who was deposed in February. State TV later showed the ailing Mubarak, aged 83, being wheeled out of an ambulance on a gurney.

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The former leader has been detained in a hospital in the capital since his first appearance in court on Aug. 3.

Mubarak, accused of corruption and ordering the killing of protesters, went on trial on August 3 in a case that has gripped the Arab world, where leaders rule for life and are seldom held to account.

The first Arab head of state to stand trial in person since popular uprisings swept the Middle East, the former air force commander faces charges that could carry the death penalty.

About 850 people were killed during the uprising and over 6,000 were wounded when security forces fired live rounds, rubber bullets and used water cannon and batons against the protesters.

The prosecutor accuses Mubarak of authorizing the use of the live ammunition to quell the protests.

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