Pence's Twitter blunder: whose flag is it, anyway?

ByJPOST.COM STAFF
February 25, 2017 19:30

US Vice President Mike Pence used the Nicaragua flag instead of the Israeli one in a recent Twitter post meant to express his administration's support of the Jewish state.




Pence

Vice President Mike Pence gives a statement after a meeting at the NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, February 20, 2017. . (photo credit:REUTERS)

US Vice President Mike Pence took to Twitter on Saturday morning to express his country's support of its long-standing ally.

Stating that the White House administration intends to extend its support of Israel past US borders (and probably alluding to American backing of Israel at the UN as well as in the on-going discussions regarding Arab-Israeli negotiations), Pence penned a Twitter post that excited Israeli officials as well as pro-Israel activists worldwide, especially in light of the wave of antisemitic incidents that have plagued the US in recent weeks.

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Pence's post was received warmly, until multiple of his 2.9 million followers noticed an embarrassing mistake in the post. The vice president used an emoji meant to represent the Israeli flag, but had instead posted an emoji of the Nicaragua flag.


"Our support for the Jewish people doesn't end at our nation's border," Pence wrote and promised that "under POTUS, the world will know America stands with Israel."

While some immediately spoke in his defense and said that the vice president made a simple mistake (seeing as the Israeli and Nicaraguan flags are similar in color scheme), others ridiculed Pence and said that he simply does not know what the Israeli flag looks like.

The post was subsequently removed from the vice president's Twitter account, but continues to live on in humorous social media debates.

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