77% say Netanyahu gave in on Temple Mount metal detectors

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July 26, 2017 03:56

When asked whether the metal detectors should have been placed on the Mount in the first place, 68% said yes, 23% no, and 9% said they did not know.

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Israeli security forces remove metal detectors which were recently installed at an entrance to the T

Israeli security forces remove metal detectors which were recently installed at an entrance to the Temple Mount. (photo credit:AMMAR AWAD / REUTERS)

Three-fourths of Israelis believe Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu surrendered to pressure when his security cabinet decided to remove metal detectors from the Temple Mount, according to a Midgam poll broadcast Tuesday night on Channel 2 News.

The poll of 502 Israelis representing a statistical sample of the adult Israeli population, found that 77% called the decision a surrender, 17% said it was not and 9% said they did not know.

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When asked whether the metal detectors should have been placed on the Mount in the first place, 68% said yes, 23% no, and 9% said they did not know.

According to the poll, 67% believe the way prime minister is dealing with the crisis over Temple Mount was not good while only 23% believe it was good, with the rest not knowing.

Palestinians stand in front of Israeli police officers and newly installed metal detectors at an entrance to the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem's Old City July 16, 2017. (Reuters)

Recent polls have shown that Netanyahu’s approval ratings have been harmed by his lawyer David Shimron’s embroilment in an investigation over the controversial purchasing of submarines and other naval vessels from a German company whose representative in Israel, Miki Ganor, employed Shimron as his lawyer.

In an interview with Channel 2 on Tuesday night, Shimron said Netanyahu had no idea he was hired by the representative of the German company ThyssenKrupp.

Shimron also denied reports that he was summoned by the police for questioning when he returns from a private visit to California.

He said he regretted working with Ganor.

“Ganor testifed about himself that he is an arch-criminal,” Shimron said. “I didn’t know until recently that I was not dealing with an honest man with proper ethics.”

Shimron lamented he’d been tried and convicted by the press but said he was not worried about what would happen in court.

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