WATCH: Jude Law reads Jewish author's letter to Nazis at Europe migrant camp

The performance was part of show called Letters Live which featured the reading of letters deemed relevant to the stories of migrants in the camp.

By REUTERS
February 23, 2016 07:42
2 minute read.

Jude Law reads Jewish author's letter to Nazis at Europe migrant camp

Jude Law reads Jewish author's letter to Nazis at Europe migrant camp

Actor Jude Law, and other British celebrities, visited the migrant camp known as the "jungle' in Calais on Sunday (February 21) in efforts to promote the cause of migrants staying in the camp.

The "Enemy at the Gates" and "Sherlock Holmes" star took part in a live performance for 200 migrants at the camp's Good Chance Theatre, reading a letter written by German and Jewish author Lion Feuchtwanger to Nazis occupying his home in 1935.

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"How do you like my house? Do you find it pleasant to live in? Did the carpets suffer while the S.A. men were looting?" he read.

The performance was part of show called Letters Live which featured the reading of letters deemed relevant to the stories of migrants in the camp.

Also visiting the camp were playwright Tom Stoppard and actor Toby Jones.

Singer Tom Odell performed and actors Juliet Stevenson, Matt Berry and comedian Shappi Khorsandi also spoke.

According to French television station BFMTV, French authorities plan to clear a large section of the camp on Wednesday (February 24).

Charity Help Refugees and other organisations have appealed the decision in the French courts.

Help Refugees said in a statement the planned operation would see the eviction of 3,000 people including more than 440 children, 291 of which are unaccompanied.

An open letter signed by the charity and written to British Prime Minister David Cameron asked the UK government to accept children to the UK who have family there and ensure minors with no right to live in the UK are protected in France.

It also asked to postpone the demolition of parts of the camp until all children living there are cared for.

Thousands of people fleeing poverty and war have converged at a camp called the "jungle" in the French city over the past year in the hope of making it to Britain where lower unemployment, the English language and fewer identity checks are still seen as big draws.

Approximately 4,000 migrants lived in the state shelters and in the "jungle", it was estimated in January. This number had spiked to 6,000 in September and many believe the figure will rise again as the spring approaches.

Incidents involving migrants and the police have surged since last October when security near the Channel Tunnel was reinforced to prevent anybody from entering the Eurotunnel infrastructure.

On January 23, some 200 refugees managed to break into the port of Calais, enabling some of them to board the front deck of a British ferry, after a demonstration of support for migrants.


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