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Police find 2nd Temple-era coins, jugs during arms raid
ByJPOST.COM STAFF
February 3, 2011 14:17
Gallery: Antiquities were kept in a backyard in the Galilee village of Mazara, found while police looked for illegal arms.

second temple artifacts 311. (photo credit:Courtesy Israel Police)

Police officers stumbled on a large stash of jugs and coins dating back from the Second Temple era in the Galilee village of Mazara on Thursday, during an arms raid.

The archeological finds were kept in a yard belonging to family suspected by police of keeping arms.



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"We're looking to see how it got to this yard," a Galilee police spokesman told The Jerusalem Post.

After finding the artifacts, a representative of the Israel Antiquities Authority was called out to the scene, and he dated the findings to the Second Temple period, the spokesman added.

The artifacts have been transferred to the Nahariya police station.

A father and his two sons were arrested from Mazara following the uncovering of the artifacts, Israel Radio reported. The police have said that they believe the coins and archeological pieces were collected from various historical sites around the country.
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