Have you ever thanked your lucky stars that you’re you? That you were born into the culture and society that you’re in? I too often forget to. Live Below the Line reminds me to be grateful — and more importantly, to fend off complacency. Just because poverty isn’t something that we see day to day does not make it any less real. The impoverished are hungry, the homeless are homeless. Children are trafficked. People killed en masse.


That’s why I got involved with The Global Poverty Project and their annual Live Below the Line Challenge. The Challenge is five days long where you have $1.50 a day to spend on food and drink. It forces you to think creatively when it comes to your next meal and understand a sliver of the gut-wrenching starvation that millions are forces to live with their whole lives. I did this, along with 250,000 others all around the world, last week, knowing all along that when Friday night came, I would eat my fill. And every day after that until next year’s challenge.


So my job is to use my health, strength, and resources to make health, strength and resources available to all. The circumstances of our family and community does not determine our worth to  God and to the world. Who knows how much farther the world would have developed in science, medicine, technology and energy if we hadn't stifled human potential with such unfair, cruel realities? 


Next year, I’d love to see a much larger number of Israelis doing this challenge because we, more than anyone, should understand. We were pulled out of the cruel winds of chaos and, from that, built the ‘Start Up-Nation’. When everyone has that opportunity, the world will be a better place.

For more information on the Live Below the Line challenge: 

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The Global Poverty Project:

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