And Hashem G-d built the side that He had taken from the man into a woman, and He brought her to the man. (Genesis 2:22)

Many of the classic Torah commentaries explain that by bringing Eve to Adam, Hashem performed with them the mitzvah of Hachnasas Kallah (providing for and assisting a bride). 

The following is a very interesting Torah thought about the merit of performing this mitzvah:  

If one examines the Talmud (Shabbos 127a), we find here a section which Jews say daily as part of the morning blessings, and as part of Birkas HaTorah (the blessings on Torah study).

Of note, in this passage we see an interesting progression – “Bikkur Cholim” (visiting the sick), followed by Hachnasas Kallah” (providing for a bride), which is then followed by Ulvayas HaMeis” (escorting the dead). 

For some reason, the Sages placed Hachnasas Kallah between visiting the sick and escorting the dead.  One might have expected these two mitzvos to be placed together. And so, why was this prayer constructed in the order that it was?

The Steipler Gaon, ZTL and others explain that the reason they are separated by Hachnasas Kallah is in order to teach that getting involved with this mitzvah is propitious in bringing merit to a person who is sick and creates separation between his sickbed and his own death!

Such is the power of this mitzvah, and a wise-hearted person will surely redouble his or her efforts in this magnificent spiritual undertaking.

Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Bregman is an internationally recognized Torah scholar, #1 best-selling author, matchmaker, entrepreneur, attorney, and media personality. His energetic and empowering messages currently reach over 350,000 people per week via social media, NYC radio, and newspaper columns worldwide. His website is www.RabbiBregman.com and his email is RabbiBregmanOfficial@gmail.com.


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