“So what books have you written?”  That’s a not uncommon question I get from people when they learn that I write.   My best known books are, unsurprisingly, the ones that were published by major publishers.  Reader’s Digest published The Bible’s Most Fascinating People in 2008; later it was reprinted by a different publisher, Chartwell Books, in 2012.  It has also been published in a bunch of translations, ranging from Russian to Estonian, Hungarian to French and German.  Oddly, no Spanish editions are available, but if you’d like it in Czech or Japanese, no problem.

The Bible: A Reader’s Guide was published in the US by Sterling’s Metro Books imprint in 2011, while New Burlington Books put it out in the UK (the British version comes with British spellings of all the words, for those of you that prefer it that way).  Thomas Nelson, a major religious imprint in the US published two books I wrote: A Year with God (released in 2010) and a Year With Jesus (released in 2011). They were daily devotionals that ironically (given their titles) took me about three months each to write.

Less well-known are my science fiction novels picked up by a small press and now available as inexpensive ebooks on Amazon.

And then there is What Would Satan Do: The Devil’s Theology, which grew out of a question someone asked me in an adult Sunday school class I was teaching: “What would Satan think about God?  That is, what’s his take on God, sin, the Bible, the second coming of Jesus, the Trinity—you know, all the traditional parts of systematic theology?”  Given that Satan is rather a minor character in the Bible, coming up with what his theology might be was, to say the least, tricky.  Still, there was a surprising amount of material available even so, and, perhaps not so surprisingly, he can’t help but be remarkably orthodox in his approach.  For instance, he is a monotheist since he’s had some interaction with God and he can probably count.  He apparently knows the Bible, quotes it, and takes it seriously.  His primary motivation seems to be that he believes God is too easy on people and lets them get away with too much.  He’s essentially a tattletale and would like nothing better than for people to get in trouble so they get what they deserve.

If you’re interested in looking at any of these things, you can visit my official Amazon author page.
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