Rebuilding blood vessels through gene therapy

By NEWYORK-PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL
December 29, 2012 00:41

Study provides insight into effectiveness of gene therapy to rebuild blood vessels in patients living with coronary artery disease.

3 minute read.



A DNA double helix

DNA. (photo credit:REUTERS)

NEW YORK  -- Diagnosed with severe coronary artery disease, a group of patients too ill for or not responding to other treatment options decided to take part in a clinical trial testing angiogenic gene therapy to help rebuild their damaged blood vessels. More than 10 years later, in a follow-up review of these patients, doctors at Baylor College of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College (where the clinical trial and review took place) and Stony Brook University Medical Center report the outcomes are promising and open the door for larger trials to begin.

The study, which appears online in the journal Human Gene Therapy, followed 31 Weill Cornell patients who were diagnosed with severe coronary artery disease and were given a direct injection into their heart muscle of gene therapy called adenovirus encoding angiogenic growth factor, or AdVEGF121. Study results show the five- and 10-year survival rate of those patients were just as good and, in some cases better, than what is seen in other groups with similar heart issues treated with traditional medical therapy.

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