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Survey: Israelis cutting down on Purim gift baskets
By DANIELLE ZIRI
14/02/2013
Large portion of Israelis will reduce the value of their packages this year by 30 to 50% compared to last year.
 
At least 10 percent of Israelis who are accustomed to sending Purim baskets for the holiday will have to reduce the value of their packages this year by 30 to 50% compared to last year, according to a survey conducted by the NGO Chasdei Naomi, which aims at combating hunger and poverty in Israel.

The survey, conducted over a national sample of 500 respondents was released this week and also showed that two percent of those who usually send packages will have to refrain from the tradition for the first time this year due to their financial situation.

Among them are more women than men, most of whom reside in Jerusalem, according to the organization.

Most of those who will continue to send Purim packets, only with cheaper products are residents of the South.

Some 28% of those who will send packages to loved ones this year said the baskets will be worth about NIS 50, a 37% decline from those they sent in 2011.

In addition, 26% said they will spend between NIS 50 and NIS 100 on each basket; 14% will spend between NIS 100 and NIS 150 and seven percent reported they would invest between NIS 150 and NIS 200.

Nevertheless, a quarter of the participants surveyed still reported they have the intention of spending over NIS 200 on each package sent.

The figures also reveal that 58% of the population are in the habit of sending Purim packets to loved ones each year.

The majority of them are Jerusalemites, followed by residents of the South, Gush Dan and the North.

When it comes to the origin of the tradition, 68% of the respondents said they believe Purim packages are a commandment related to the Book of Esther while 20% said they don’t know where the custom comes from. The remaining 12% found other various explanations for the packets.
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