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Morsi defiant after Egypt's crackdown on Muslim Brotherhood
By REUTERS
14/10/2013
Deposed leader's family says he won't negotiate with authorities; he is due to face trial on Nov. 4 on charges of inciting violence.
 
CAIRO - The family of deposed Islamist President Mohamed Morsi said on Sunday he would not enter any negotiations or accept any compromises following a crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood by military-backed authorities.

Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, was ousted by the military on July 3 following mass protests against his rule. Authorities have since launched a crackdown on his Muslim Brotherhood, killing hundreds at protest camps and marches and arresting about 2,000 Islamist activists and group members.

Morsi has been held in a secret location since his overthrow and has not been seen. He is due to face trial on Nov. 4 on charges of inciting violence.

"The president will not retreat, or negotiate or accept compromises especially after all the martyrs, the wounded, the arrested and missing," his family said in a statement carried on the Muslim Brotherhood's website (www.ikhwanonline.com).

"No matter how much they try to keep him away, the president will not retreat from a return to the democratic path, even if his soul is the price of this democratic path," the family said in a statement to mark the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha.

Morsi and other Brotherhood leaders accuse the army of staging a coup that reversed the gains of the 2011 revolt against Hosni Mubarak.

The army says it was carrying out the people's will and has presented a plan it says will lead to free and fair elections. The Brotherhood has refused to take part in the transition, saying it would legitimize a coup.

Neither side seems prepared to take part in an inclusive political process.

In one of the bloodiest days since the military took power, Morsi supporters clashed with opponents and security forces last week, with state media reporting that 57 were killed.
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