Archived letter shows Trump's grandfather asked to return to Germany

The series of events that ended up with Donald Trump being elected US president.

By REUTERS
November 22, 2016 21:52

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BERLIN - German archivists have found a letter written by US President-elect Donald Trump's grandfather, asking to be allowed to return to his German homeland after his wife failed to settle in to life in the United States.

The letter, signed by Friedrich Trump, who left Germany at the age of 16 in 1885, was unearthed at the state archives in the western German region of Rhineland-Palatinate.

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After the turn of the century, Friedrich Trump returned from the United States to Germany, where he met and married his wife, Elisabeth, with whom he returned to New York.

"She lasted for around two years before making it known that she wanted to return to Germany," Franz Maier of the Rhineland-Palatinate state archives in Speyer told Reuters Television.

Friedrich had, however, failed to de-register properly before he left Germany and was not therefore allowed to be re-naturalized in Bavaria, which was then its own kingdom.

An accompanying document in the archived dossier read: "the settlement in Bavaria cannot be permitted".

That fateful rejection set off the series of events that ended up with Donald Trump being elected US president.





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