In 1987, Sanders said JFK made him nauseous; now he praises him in new ad

The Democratic president hopeful was appalled by Kennedy's position on the Cuban Revolution.

Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks after the senate voted on a resolution ending U.S. military support for the war in Yemen on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 13, 2018. (photo credit: REUTERS/JOSHUA ROBERTS)
Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) speaks after the senate voted on a resolution ending U.S. military support for the war in Yemen on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., December 13, 2018.
(photo credit: REUTERS/JOSHUA ROBERTS)
Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders has launched a new ad praising John Fitzgerald Kennedy on Monday, despite in the past he had very harsh words about the former US president, to the point of saying that he "nauseated" him.
America chose to go to the moon not because it was easy, but because it was hard, Kennedy argued in footage included in the 30-second clip, where Sanders states that the slain leader knew that the US gives its best before significant challenges and not small ones.
However, Sanders did not always seem so impressed with the leader's record. In an interview with a university newspaper a little over 30 years ago, on the contrary, the Democratic Vermont Senator even said that Kennedy's position about the Cuban Revolution appalled him.
"President Kennedy was elected while I was at the University of Chicago, that was 1960. I remember being physically nauseated by his speech and that doesn't happen very often. He debated Nixon on Cuba. And their hatred for the Cuban revolution, both of them, was so strong," Sanders said in a 1987 interview to Gadfly, a student newspaper at the University of Vermont.
The interview is reproduced in a 2015 BuzzFeed article that includes an image of the original paper's relevant pages.
"Kennedy was young and appealing and ostensibly liberal, but I think at that point, seeing through Kennedy, and what liberalism was, was probably a significant step for me to understand that conventional politics or liberalism was not what was relevant," the Democratic hopeful added.

In the newly released ad, Sanders paints a very different picture of the legendary president.
"President Kennedy knew settling for half-measures wasn't good enough," he is heard saying, while images of civil right movement rallies and other relevant historical events are interpolated with moments of his own campaign.
"So when candidates say we can't guarantee health care for all, make college affordable for all, combat climate change, or create a world at peace, remember that America is best when we strive to do big things, even when it's hard," Sanders adds.