Kudos to the Khan

The Khan theater faces the 2005/06 season with confidence. It opens December 31 with "The City of Small People" based on Sholom Aleichem's stories of a 19th century Jewish Russia.

By HELEN KAYE
December 26, 2005 07:40
1 minute read.
khan theater 88 298

khan theater 88 298. (photo credit: )

 
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'The Khan offers an intelligent and challenging antithesis to the culture of commercialism," cheered a local theater critic when the little Jerusalem-based theater won an Israel Theater Prize for Return to the Desert and Fleeting Shadow in 2004. It continued its winning ways with Micki Gurevitch's "Happiness" this year and the low-key Gurevitch himself, who's been the Khan's artistic director for the past five years, was recently awarded the prestigious EMET Prize for his contribution to Israeli Theater. So the Khan faces the 2005/06 season with confidence. It opens December 31 with "The City of Small People" based on Sholom Aleichem's stories of a 19th century Jewish Russia, and directed by Ofira Henig. It's followed by "The Summer" by Roman Weingarten directed by the Khan's new, young in-house director, Udi Ben-Moshe. The play is a coming-of-age story that takes place over six days and nights at a country vacation home and is scheduled for the end of March. The season's third play (April '06), is Sophie Treadwell's "Machinal". It's the story of an office romance that goes bad and ends in murder, loosely based on the sensational 1927 murder trial of Ruth Snyder. It was a Broadway hit in 1928. The last play, being written by Gurevitch and Daniel Lapin, is temporarily titled "Comedy" and will open next May.

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