The rise of blogs was something I was totally unaware of before 2009. For me the web meant websites and email until then. YouTube, or that you could download music and movies was a bit more on my radar. Many people mentioned how many things there were to do online. I didn’t know much about the web despite working from a website which featured me in the advice category.

My writing wasn’t good enough in English, so I often wanted to write to others better. Being a writer was close to what I had in mind as a career with communication being important to me. I was introduced to Myspace then blogged on the advice site I was on.

During this time I worried about being hacked, so I didn’t do much online in the business sense. Antivirus software I was told wasn’t necessary by some people, but others said it was mandatory. The opinions I chose to follow were the more conservative views rather than ”Who worries about those ones.”

This was how I chose to blog in a natural sense finding myself to be Conservative. Over the years I figured out that I had a conservative personality, but took risks. I hardly ever worried about what others thought to the full extent.

Now, I'm a Conservative blogger who speaks on here about issues in that tone. Right now I no longer wish to be influenced by Canadian or North American politics. At this time I blog about societal issues which may never be correctly addressed. Political parties do cross old party lines in topics such as oil, peace, rights, and gender.

To vote now can be confusing for many, so I stay out of it, letting people make up their own minds. I would like to talk about the issues I see in this world while letting others decide for themselves. Oil, Natural gas, or any other fuel seems to be expensive now throughout the world. I don’t blame politicians for this -- it is a matter of terror, environment, and inflation.

There is a lot of anger directed at politicians when they make changes which also affect personal circumstances. 'What to do' is a question with no answers when people voted for change. This may cause a lot of fear for those in office I feel. Making change being required, but sticking to issues which affect us isn’t always the case.

Many people suffer with various things under our government, or any government despite our rights being more protected. We have health care even when out of work and possibly out of home, but there is shelter here. I see what happened in Syria and Libya which also had oil protecting the country’s GDP.

We should count ourselves as lucky during this time of relentless attacks which are foreign inspired. We may not have a place to turn if we direct anger at those we elected in the first place. Stand by these people we elected, and I mean all sitting politicians of whatever party that is in office representing us. Encourage the elected to make good decisions before embarrassing yourself online.

Being a voter does mean a person will need to follow rules of behavior despite a voter card being the one right we have. Would we agree If martial law were declared like happened in some war times' past, or during terror situations such as what happened to Quebec in 1970. "When we vote is when we decide" was a saying I heard when I was younger.

My post on here may not make sense despite an attempt now to pull it together for you. Opinion bloggers are responsible for what they write as I am too. Comments on news stories, or events should be truth based. Harshness calling for negative actions to be directed towards others should face repercussions somehow even if it is anonymous, and online.

I support freedom of speech which doesn’t infringe on the rights of other human beings. This topic Freedom of Speech would be for speech on the internet as well. We should see what potential leaders address as the most important issues while in office, and look at factors other than GDP or war. We need to look at rights again which include addressing discrimination, gender parity, and sovereignty. 


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