A liturgy of epic proportions begins as John, the scribe, is commissioned by an Angel to write down his visions.

After this I looked, and behold, a door standing open in heaven! And the first voice, which I had heard speaking to me like a trumpet, said, “Come up here, and I will show you what must take place after this.”  (Revelation 4:1)

Long before Emmet's encounter with the mysterious red door in The Lego Movie, a confrontation takes place between a ruler and someone resembling an ancient prophet, who warns us that “he is coming.” From the depths of his fortress enters "Lord Business" who orders his accompanying robots to retrieve the kraggle (a massive tube of superglue) that will be used to seal his evil empire for eternity.  As the weapon is being carried off, the ancient one boldly proclaims a poetic prophecy. His eyes light up the room as his words flow with symmetry, imagination and intimate knowledge of a special one to come who unveils the piece of resistance that can disarm the kraggle, hence becoming the most important person of all time. Lord Business laughs at the made up legend and dismisses the ancient prophet with a swift kick in the pants causing him to fall out of sight.


Eight and a half years after the ancient prophesy was spoken,
Emmet wakes up to a very typical day in the life of a Lego person … In Lego terms, eight and a half years is ambiguous, and in the Bible it can mean thousands of years, as God told Moses that a thousand years is like a day (Psalm 90).  The first thing Emmet does after opening his eyes is remind himself of the rules for a happy life. Emmet's personal mission is to be obedient to every rule ever written. He heads out to his construction site with a smile on his face and a song in his heart, thinking that everything is awesome.  He greets everyone by name even though no one really knows his name. He is so ordinary that he is unattractive and overlooked by his peers. Yet, unbeknownst to him and everyone else, Emmet is the Master Builder.


Isaiah was a major prophet in the Old Testament who was well acquainted with kings and royal palaces. He loved Jerusalem with all his heart and was a poetic master of the Hebrew language. He foretold of one to come who had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him. Nothing in his appearance that we should desire him. (Isaiah 53) Yet He would make intercession for the transgressors. 


Emmet is immersed into a world of fellow citizens who are also following instructions, or at least "appearing" to adhere. But when the boss's instructions subside and the work day ends, their focus shifts back to themselves, indulging in what satisfies and satiates their desires. When Emmet’s work is finished, he just wants to have a meal with the people he loves – He is willing to join anyone who invites him! Yet no one is interested. Left behind by his fellow workers, Emmet tries to catch up and accidentally bumps into an obstacle causing his instruction manual to eject from his hands. Upon finding the manual he is distracted by a sound in the distance and begins to investigate it's origin. The instructions say to immediately report trespassers or anything that is out of the ordinary, which of course he is about to do … until the trespasser reveals herself in an ever-enticing manner. Emmet is disoriented and struck with temptation just long enough to allow the trespasser to flee. Emmet ensues, but falls into a pit before he can reach the assailant. He just wanted to find out what she was searching for and offer her a way out.  


Once in the pit, Emmet finds himself in unknown territory, and without his instruction book. This is when the door appears and a voice is speaking to him.  He is forced to think on his own. Does he dare?

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In a book called They Thought for Themselves, Sid Roth tells the story of ten amazing Jews who dared to go beyond their comfort zone. Although very different, they all reached their supernatural destiny by the one thing that "connects" them.  www.theythoughtforthemselves.com


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