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    Knesset Members Moshe Feiglin, Uri Ariel and Tzippi Hotebeli joined a prayer service held by the Movement for the Rebuilding of the Templel at the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.
    .
    The presence of the MKs prevented the Jerusalem District Police from arresting any of the other worshippers as the MKs have parliamentary immunity. Officers with the Waqf Guard, the special force tasked with maintaining public order at the Temple Mount, attempted to prevent Feiglin from entering the premises, but he insisted on his right to pray there while wearing a tallit.


    The prayer service itself was held under police protection, as the MKs were subjected to harsh expletives by the other Muslim worshipers at the site. 


    Feiglin stressed the importance of maintaining the rights of all Jewish worshipers in the holy site: "At first, the [police] tried to stop us from entering the plaza, saying that we would be causing a public disturbance, but there is nothing 100 men and women armed with a tallit can''t do. Surrounded by police officers, and with the Ilsmaic fanatics yelling at us, we stood off to the side far from any Muslim building and prayed."


    Feiglin said, "I felt a great sense of duty, as well as a sense of privilege, to stand here and make sure that every Jew in the world is free to pray as they see fit. It is inconceivable that one religion will assume sole exclusive ownership over a location which is the holiest place for Jews worldwide...we have to remember that there is more bringing us together that there is pulling us apart, and that the least we can do is allow every man and every woman to pray according to their conscience."






No, not really.




Here''s the actual news item that I parodied:






    Knesset Members Stav Shaffir, Tamar Zandberg and Michal Rozin on Tuesday joined the monthly prayer service held by the Women of the Wall at the Western Wall Plaza in Jerusalem. 


    The Women of the Wall have been holding monthly prayer services at the Western Wall for the past 24 years. They do so while donning a tallit – the traditional Jewish prayer shawl – which is illegal for women visiting the site, and often results in their arrest. 


    However, the presence of the MKs prevented the Jerusalem District Police from arresting any of the women on Tuesday as the MKs have parliamentary immunity. 


    Officers with the Kotel Guard, the special force tasked with maintaining public order at the Western Wall Plaza, attempted to prevent Shaffir from entering the premises, but she insisted on her right to pray there while wearing a tallit.


    The prayer service itself was held under police protection, as the women were subjected to harsh expletives by the other worshipers at the site. 


    Shaffir stressed the importance of maintaining the rights of all Jewish worshipers in the holy site: "At first, the [police] tried to stop us from entering the plaza, saying that we would be causing a public disturbance, but there is nothing 100 women armed with a tallit can''t do. Surrounded by police officers, and with the haredi men yelling at us from across the fence, with stood before the Western Wall and prayed."


    Shaffir said that while she does not normally don the Jewish prayer shawl, "I felt a great sense of duty, as well as a sense of privilege, to stand here and make sure that every Jew in the world is free to pray as they see fit. It is inconceivable that one faction of Judaism will assume ownership over the holiest place for Jews worldwide."


    According to Shaffir, "While there are real differences between the various factions in Judaism on the correct way to worship God, we have to remember that there is more bringing us together that there is pulling us apart, and that the least we can do is allow every man and every woman to pray according to their conscience." 


    Western Wall Rabbi Shmuel Rabinowitz commented on the prayer service: "Today, the first of [the Jewish month of] Nisan we witnessed harsh scenes, the likes of which have not been seen in the Western Wall Plaza since its liberation. A group of women, seeking to express their world view, chose to make the Western Wall the site of their protest and create an unnecessary conflict.


    "Their actions are against the law and are in violation of a High Court of Justice ruling as well as the attorney general''s directives, especially since they were given permission to hold their services near Robinson''s Arch," he said, referring to an area along the western wall of the Temple Mount, which is at a distance from the Western Wall Plaza. 


    Rabinowitz said that the Women of the Wall "insist on holding their services in the women''s gallery, while offending the other worshipers. Their actions will inflict upon Jerusalem the civil war that was once its destruction. 


    "The Western Wall is the one place shared by all the people of Israel and it is not the place to make statements or express world views. I urge all those who care about the Western Wall to call to keep any disputes outside the plaza and to leave the people of Israel one place that is free of protest, riots and hatred."


And here is additional material from this paper that makes today''s events, compared to what Jews sugger on the Temple Mount, so ironically painful:


“Even though I’m secular, and don’t usually wear tallit [prayer shawl], I came because religion in Jerusalem is based on one type and doesn’t respect the different streams of Judaism and the different ways of praying,” Shaffir told the Jerusalem Post. “This place belongs to them as well as the Orthodox.”  She said that she would consider introducing legislative measures in the Knesset to protect women’s rights at the Western Wall.


Police tried to prevent Shaffir and Zandberg from bringing tallitot into the Western Wall plaza, but they eventually managed to pass through along with their tallitot, because they have diplomatic immunity.


Police asked the MKs to leave their talitot outside of the site in order to prevent a disturbance of the public order, but Zandberg and her fellow MKs refused to leave their prayer shawls behind.  “As a member of the Knesset, I demand entry,” she said. “The law with regard to holy places as interpreted by the extreme denomination is not acceptable to me and I refuse to leave my talit outside.”


Shaffir described the service as a moving experience, and insisted that the right of women to pray according to their beliefs should be upheld.


“There’s no room in this country for coercion by one religious stream towards others,” Shaffir told the Post. “These women choose to pray how they want to, and we need to promote this freedom for all denominations of Judaism to practice the religion according to their beliefs, especially here at this holy place.”


Shaffir said that it was important to act in a sensitive manner but that the Women of the Wall prayer services “are not harming anyone.”


“This is their way, they’re not dressed in an exposed fashion, they don’t go into the men’s section, they stand at the side with their tallitot and pray,” she said.


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