Bill Clinton says US anti-gay marriage law should be nixed

By REUTERS
March 8, 2013 06:36
1 minute read.

 
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WASHINGTON - Former US President Bill Clinton, who in 1996 signed into law an act defining marriage as between a man and woman, said on Thursday the measure was unconstitutional and should be overturned by the US Supreme Court.

In an opinion piece in the Washington Post, Clinton, a Democrat who served as president from 1993 to 2001, said it was "a very different time" when he signed the Defense of Marriage Act into law. No US state then recognized gay marriage, although some were moving in that direction, he said.

With federal lawmakers then debating various responses, "some quite draconian," many supporters of the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, believed its passage would defuse moves to push for a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, Clinton wrote.

Noting that the Supreme Court will hear arguments on March 27 challenging the constitutionality of DOMA, Clinton wrote the justices "must decide whether it is consistent with the principles of a nation that honors freedom, equality and justice above all, and is therefore constitutional.

"As the president who signed the act into law, I have come to believe that DOMA is contrary to those principles and in fact, incompatible with our Constitution."

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