Conviction overturned for case spotlighted in 'Making a Murderer'

By REUTERS
August 13, 2016 04:19
1 minute read.

 
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A federal judge on Friday overturned the murder conviction of one of two Wisconsin men serving life sentences for the 2005 slaying of a freelance photographer in a case spotlighted in the popular Netflix television documentary "Making a Murderer."

Magistrate Judge William Duffin ruled that the guilty verdict returned by a trial jury in 2007 against Brendan Dassey was based on a coerced confession he gave as a 16-year-old youth with a learning disability.

Dassey and his uncle, Steven Avery, were convicted in separate trials of killing freelance photographer Teresa Halbach at Avery's home in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin. Halbach's charred remains were found in an incineration barrel and a burn pit on Avery's property, about 80 miles (130 km) north of Milwaukee.

The case was the subject of the 10-part Netflix-released documentary "Making a Murderer," which questioned the handling of the investigation and the motivation of Manitowoc County law enforcement officials.

In his ruling on Friday, Duffin wrote that misconduct by Dassey's own lawyer was "indefensible," including his permitting investigators to interrogate his client without being present.

The judge also faulted Dassey's interrogation by investigators, who assured the teenager "he would not be punished if he admitted participating in the offenses" and that "he had nothing to worry about."

"These repeated false promises, when considered in conjunction with all relevant factors, most especially Dassey's age, intellectual deficits, and the absence of a supportive adult, rendered Dassey's confession involuntary," Duffin said.

Dassey is set for release within 90 days unless prosecutors plan to retry him.


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