Israel's BrightSource technology makes MIT's 2011 review

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF
March 8, 2011 20:10
1 minute read.

 
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Dual Israel-US developer of solar thermal power plants BrightSource Energy has been included in Technology Review's 2011 list of the world's most innovative technology companies.

BrightSource's LPT 550 power tower brought it to the magazine's attention.

The system produces electricity the same way as traditional power plants – by creating high temperature steam to turn a turbine. However, instead of using fossil fuels or nuclear power to create the steam, BrightSource uses proprietary software to control thousands of mirrors to reflect sunlight onto a boiler filled with water that sits atop a tower. When the sunlight hits the boiler, the water inside is heated and creates high temperature steam. The steam is then piped to a conventional turbine which generates electricity.

The LPT 550 solar system is also designed to minimize the solar plant’s environmental impact, reducing the need for extensive land grading and concrete pads. In order to conserve precious desert water, LPT 550 uses air-cooling to convert the steam back into water, resulting in a 95 percent reduction in water usage compared to conventional wet-cooling in competing technologies. The water is then returned to the boiler in an environmentally-friendly closed process.

The magazine has been published by MIT since 1899.

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