Leading Arab journalist Mohamed Hassanein Heikal dies at 92

By REUTERS
February 17, 2016 12:56
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

CAIRO - Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, the Arab world's best known political commentator, died on Wednesday at age 92, Egyptian state television reported.

The leading Egyptian journalist rose to prominence as editor in chief of Egypt's Al-Ahram, widely regarded as the newspaper of record in the Arab world during his tenure.

Heikal was a close associate of President Gamal Abdel Nasser, one of the army officers who overthrew the British-backed monarchy in 1952, and his insight into regional affairs was highly respected by many Arab leaders.

Heikal's daily columns often offered the best clues on the thinking of Nasser, a charismatic figure who challenged the West and was a champion of pan-Arab nationalism. He served as a minister of national guidance under Nasser.

After Nasser's death in 1970, Heikal played a key role in ensuring that his successor Anwar Sadat consolidated power as president, advising him to push out Nasser loyalists.

Heikal later fell out with Sadat after Al-Ahram criticized the president. He was arrested along with hundreds of other figures seen as a threat to Sadat's policies, including the 1979 peace treaty with Israel and economic liberalization.

He was released after President Hosni Mubarak came to power following Sadat's assassination by Islamist militants in 1981. Heikal kept a low profile abroad until the 2000s, when he returned to Egypt and became a regular commentator, hosting his own television program and resuming his well-known columns.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Breaking news
November 15, 2018
Hanegbi apologizes for 'attacks on south are minor' comments

By JERUSALEM POST STAFF