Lebanon parliament approves new government

By REUTERS
February 15, 2019 23:33
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 BEIRUT, Feb 15 (Reuters) - Lebanon's parliament gave the new coalition government the green light to start working with a vote of confidence on Friday after a televised session to debate its proposed policies.

Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri has said the government will prioritize economic reforms needed to bring Lebanon's massive public debt under control.
The government was agreed this month following wrangling over the make-up of the cabinet that had lasted since soon after a parliamentary election last May.


Most of the major parties represented in parliament have places in the cabinet, including those of President Michel Aoun, the Western-backed Hariri and Parliament Speaker Nabih Berri, as well as the Iran-backed Hezbollah group.


The reforms the government plans to pursue could be "difficult and painful," but are required to avoid a worsening of economic, financial and social conditions, its statement of policy said.


The government has pledged a "financial correction" equal to at least one percent of GDP a year over five years, starting with this year's budget.


This would be achieved by boosting revenues and cutting spending, starting with transfers to the state-run power company, which the World Bank has said represents a "staggering burden" on public finances.

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