Libya leader, in Khartoum, thanks Sudan for weapons

By REUTERS
November 26, 2011 00:27

 
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KHARTOUM - Sudanese weapons and ammunition sent through Egypt helped Libya's former rebels oust Muammar Gaddafi and take control of the North African country, the head of Libya's interim ruling council said on Friday.

Relations between Khartoum and Tripoli were strained during Gaddafi's rule because of the slain leader's support for rebels in Sudan's western Darfur region and in South Sudan, which seceded in July under a 2005 peace deal.

Sudanese officials now hope for better ties with Libya, which shares a desert border with Sudan. Mustafa Abdel Jalil, chairman of Libya's National Transitional Council, arrived in Khartoum on Friday on his first official visit.

"If not for Sudanese military assistance, it would not have been possible to liberate Kufra," he said at a conference of Sudan's ruling National Congress Party, referring to a town in Libya's remote southeastern desert.

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